Monday, January 04, 2010

What to do with a 100 pounds Amazon voucher?

Gratefully received from my parents-in-law, but what should I spend it on?! A nice question, if ever there was one!

Some presently in my basket:

  • The Story of Christianity - David Bentley Hart
  • In the Aftermath: Provocations and Laments - David Bentley Hart
  • Martin Heidegger - George Steiner
  • The Politics of Discipleship: Becoming Postmaterial Citizens (Church and Postmodern Culture) - Graham Ward
  • Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature - Richard Rorty
  • GloboChrist: The Great Commission Takes a Postmodern Turn (Church and Postmodern Culture) - Carl A. Raschke
  • Philo of Alexandria: An Exegete for His Time (Novum Testamentum Supplements) - Peder Borgen
  • A Brief Guide to Philo - Kenneth Schenck
  • Trouble with Strangers: A Study of Ethics - Terry Eagleton
  • Black Mass: Apocalyptic Religion and the Death of Utopia - John Gray
  • The Last Word - Thomas Nagel
  • Blue Parakeet - Scot Mcknight
  • Reading Hegel's Phenomenology (Studies in Continental Thought) - John Edward Russon
  • Science: Key Concepts in Philosophy - Steven French
  • Philosophy of Science: A Contemporary Introduction (Routledge Contemporary Introductions to Philosophy S.) - Alex Rosenberg
  • Early Narrative Christology: The Lord in the Gospel of Luke - C. Kavin Rowe
  • Eccentric Existence - D. Kelsey
  • After Finitude: An Essay on the Necessity of Contingency - Quentin Meillassoux
  • Badiou's "Being and Event": A Reader's Guide (Reader's Guides) (Reader's Guides (Continuum Paperback)) - Christopher Norris
  • After Theory - Terry Eagleton
  • A few Badiou books
  • Joan Stambaugh's translation of Heidegger's Being and Time
  • Christ in Evolution - Ilia Delio

Any thoughts, protests, additional recommendations?

18 Comments:

At 1/04/2010 11:49 PM, Anonymous Christopher Heard said...

Would you like a link to my Amazon wish list, and my mailing address?

 
At 1/04/2010 11:55 PM, Anonymous Jason Goroncy said...

There are, of course, things other than books that one might choose to spend such a generous gift on. But if you insist on getting books, Made in Italy: Food and Stories by Giorgio Locatelli is a real must. Steiner on Heidegger sounds totally awesome, though I've not read it.

After reading and enjoying McKnight's A Community Called Atonement, I had high-ish hopes for Blue Parakeet. Unfortunately, as it turned out, it was one of the most disappointing reads I've had in years. Definately one to leave off the list.

If you get stuck, you could always use your voucher to get me something from my Wishlist :-)

 
At 1/05/2010 12:44 AM, Anonymous James F. McGrath said...

I think you'd find The Blue Parakeet rather too casual and lighthearted for your refined scholarly tastes - but it makes an important point (that we all 'pick and choose') in a manner accessible to conservative Evangelicals. I'm using it in my Sunday school class.

Personally, if I had a $100 Amazon certificate, I'd rather use in on one expensive book (e.g. a Syriac lexicon) that I'd probably otherwise never afford, than half a dozen less expensive books that I might well acquire eventually.

 
At 1/05/2010 9:01 AM, Anonymous Terry Wright said...

I echo what James says about buying a more expensive book. The DBH book is an excellent addition to your library, though - it's beautifully illustrated, and DBH's prose is, as ever, glorious.

 
At 1/05/2010 5:20 PM, Anonymous Jon said...

Martin Heidegger - George Steiner

Actually, I preferred Richard Polt's introduction to Heidegger.

Eccentric Existence - D. Kelsey

Looks good.

 
At 1/05/2010 5:50 PM, Anonymous Nick said...

Hi Chris,

As mentioned on our stroll back to the office, there's this collection of books which I picked up:

Old Testament Zondervan Illustrated Backgrounds Commentary ISBN: 0310255724

Or there's the Adam McHugh book I showed you - 'Introverts in the Church'

If I think of anything else I'll let you know.

 
At 1/05/2010 11:08 PM, Anonymous Andrew Esqueda said...

"The Hebrew Gospel and the Development of the Synoptic Tradition"
by James R. Edwards

 
At 1/05/2010 11:33 PM, Anonymous Chris Tilling said...

Chris, there is a simple two letter answer. Do I need to even type it? :-p

Jason (and James), thanks for that tip. I just removed the Blue Parakeet from my list.

Thanks, Nick. I hear VERY good things about Kavin.

Terry, thanks. Does he offer something distinctive, or does it mostly recycle?

Thanks, Jon. Do you know if the Amazon purchase includes both volumes?

Nick, thanks for those. Let me know what you think of the introspection book.

Andrew, thanks. Just got a review copy. Is it an important work, you think?

 
At 1/06/2010 8:30 AM, Anonymous Terry Wright said...

Chris, I wouldn't describe the DBH as an academic book in any way. It's more of a gift book, but definitely one worth having. One plus from my point of view is that he covers things like the Ethiopian church - things that don't often crop up.

 
At 1/06/2010 12:35 PM, Anonymous David Boogerd said...

I'm currently reading David Bentley Hart's 'Atheist Delusions'. Terrific read and a terrific author. You've read that one yet Chris?

Greetings from Holland,
David

PS: Great blog.

 
At 1/06/2010 1:03 PM, Anonymous dan said...

I also received an amazon gift voucher.

I'll be picking up:

-"Occidental Eschatology" by Jacob Taubes
-"The Time That Remains" by Giorgio Agamben
-"The Deliverance of God" by Douglas Campbell
-and I think I'll pick up that John Gray book you mentioned (it looks like a good companion volume to the Taubes book)

 
At 1/07/2010 8:16 AM, Anonymous Andrew Esqueda said...

Chris, Jim Edward's book is a very important book, especially because he is presenting a new and innovative critique of "Q." I met with Jim about two weeks ago and we had a wonderful conversation about the book. Also, a heads up before reading his book. Jim West criticized him for not referencing Mark Goodacre; in my conversation with him he was very clear that he is presenting something new and wholly other than Mark's critique. I hope you enjoy the book.

 
At 1/07/2010 10:22 AM, Anonymous Rev Tony B said...

I'm currently reading Diarmaid McCulloch's "History of Christianity" - can't recommend it highly enough. He starts with a good survey of the Hebrew and Greek history to lay the soil into which Christianity was planted, and then offers a magisterial survey of the growth and mutation of the various branches of the faith. Very readable, but very thorough at the same time.

 
At 1/07/2010 7:34 PM, Anonymous Edgar Foster said...

Commentary on the Apocalypse by Oecumenius

Feast and Future by Hakan Ulfgard

The Kalam Cosmological Argument for God by Mark R. Nowacki

 
At 1/08/2010 1:25 AM, Anonymous Chris Tilling said...

Terry, that is very helpful. Thanks.

David Boogerd, thanks for your comment. Yes, I have got Hart’s book. And I think it is brilliant!

Dan, thanks. You will LOVE Doug’s book. HUGELY important work.

Andrew, thanks for that info. I look forward to reading it.

Rev Tony, yea got that one. I have just about finished his overview of the biblical material. Have you seen his TV documentary?

Edgar, thanks for these – and I have never heard of any of them!

 
At 1/08/2010 11:06 AM, Anonymous Jon said...

Chris,

I think it does include both - which is a little bizarre - it doesn't really make it clear though.

 
At 1/09/2010 2:59 AM, Anonymous Edward T. Babinski said...

I've found Dale Allison, and also Robert M. Price to be fun and intriguing reading, or check out my amazon.com wish lists for ideas, arranged by topic, 140 of them:

http://www.amazon.com/Edward-T-Babinski/wishlist/3JQ7OLD5KDHWQ/ref=cm_pdp_wish_all

 
At 1/10/2010 7:27 AM, Anonymous Judy Redman said...

Chris,

I think James is right about Blue Parakeet as something for your tastes. It's aimed more at the "informed Christian layperson" than the specialist, but I certainly wouldn't describe it as a "disappointing read". Like James, I think McKnight has something very important to say and he says it well for his target audience.

One hundred pounds should get you more than one book, though, unless it's a very expensive one. Enjoy spending it.

 

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